How to Write a Mission Statement

Write an effective mission statement with WhiteSmoke writing software.  First, read the following tips about how to write a mission statement. Then, gather the information and ideas you need, write your mission statement, and turn to WhiteSmoke for thorough proofreading.  By following these steps, you will write a mission statement that will be professional and presentable.

The first thing to know here is what a mission statement actually is.  Whether you need to know how to write a business mission statement, how to write a personal mission statement, or how to write a mission statement for a church, know that a mission statement is a formal document, usually 3-5 sentences long, which states the objectives of an organization or company.  But you are interested in knowing how to write a good mission statement, right?  So let's take the definition further.  A high quality mission statement should include information about why your organization exists and what should be achieved in the future.  It may appear in a business plan or other documents to be presented to others, or you may write a personal mission statement for self-improvement.

In order to craft a good mission statement, consider your organization's values, nature, and work.  Why was your organization created, and what are the current goals?  What needs does your organization seek to address?  How is your organization concentrating on these needs?  By which principles or beliefs is your organization guided?

To answer these questions, try involving people at all levels of your organization.  Ask customers or people who benefit from your services.  Ask employees and volunteers.  Ask directors or sponsors, and ask yourself.  Collect a wide range of responses so you really understand what is at the core of your organization.  Work on combining the responses into a few central ideas.  Combine these ideas into focused sentences for your mission statement.  And remember when you are learning how to write a mission statement that after reading your document, people should be able to identify three things: the purpose of your organization, the business of your organization (what your organization does), and the values of your organization.

Once you put your ideas on paper and draft your mission statement, you need to proofread.  Use this checklist of questions to guide you for the first stage of editing:

Does my mission statement

  1.  express the purpose of my organization in a way that people will be inspired to give their support and ongoing commitment?
  2.  motivate people who are connected to my organization?
  3.  convey my message in a convincing, easy-to-understand way?
  4.  contain active verbs that describe what my organization does?
  5.  get the objectives across in a short enough message that people will remember and be able to repeat?


When you can answer yes to all of these questions, you are ready for the second stage of proofreading.  Here, use WhiteSmoke writing software to check punctuation, spelling, and English grammar.  Even with the best ideas, a mission statement that does not follow English grammar rules, does not have proper punctuation, or has spelling errors will not portray the right message.  Readers may actually misunderstand what you are trying to say; if they understand but see the mistakes, they will doubt your intelligence and credibility.

In your journey to understand how to write a business mission statement or personal mission statement, don t risk these negative reactions.  Follow the aforementioned tips and proofread your English writing with revolutionary WhiteSmoke software.  In one click, access every useful writing tool, like the check and correct features listed above, an online dictionary full of extensive definitions and translations, and a thesaurus for finding synonyms for the best proactive verbs and more.  Be confident in how to write a mission statement, and impress your readers with the high quality of your document when you have WhiteSmoke's help.

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